Interpreting Middle East Economic News and Analyzing Market Trends

Category: Jordan

Worldwide youth unemployment stuck at record levels, outlook for the Middle East is especially poor

Youth Unemployment Global

Click on map for a large image

We reported last year on the terrible outlook for youth unemployment around the world (read the story here).  The map above is an update on this global problem.  The situation is particularly bank for the Middle East and Southern Europe.  The are no indications that this problem will go away any time soon.

 

Read more ...

Middle East high tech startups take off

Silicon-Valley-Middle-East-2013

Source:  Smithsonian.com

The Middle East has been a hotspot for tech start-ups lately.  This growing trend has been overshadowed by all the bad news coming out of the region since 2011.  Don’t expect any competition to Silicon Valley any time soon, but entrepreneurship is catching on in the Middle East in a big way.  Political troubles are only adding more fuel to the trend.

 

Read more ...

The idiots guide to understanding the Middle East

Idiots Guide to ME

Image source: @DismantleFed

 

For everyone out there who’s confused as to what’s going on in the Middle East, @DismantleFed put together a nice graph summarizing all the players, who they play with and who they don’t play with.  Still confused?  Well, this is the Middle East.  Click on the graph above to get a full-size version.

 

     

Egypt & Jordan: Taking away subsidies is proving more challenging than expected

Governments in the Middle East, regardless whether they have oil wealth or not, are being forced to rethink the subsidies they give to their citizens either to shore up their finances or to move along a more sustainable path.  We’ve discussed issues with subsidies in previous posts, here, here, here and here.  

 

Government’s in the region put themselves in the predicament they are in decades ago as a way to keep their citizens happy and give them a sense that their governments are doing something for them.  However, decades later and millions of people later, these governments are facing a financial crisis and no longer have a choice but to reduce subsidies.  In doing so, they are putting their survivability at risk as is the case with Egypt and Jordan (see below).

 

Read more ...